5×5 Pours

Pour 8
Pour 9

Identical elements… different results. Pours 8 and 9 shared the same paint mixtures. Identical grounds were prepped exactly the same. They were poured on the same day, 9 immediately after 8. Technique shifted slightly with my mood, so it came out more floral than horror.

I also tried something new, used tools to manipulate the wet paint. A thin pokey stick (wood skewer from the kitchen) helped bring out the claws and wisps in 8 and pulled stems on 9. I also added drops of paint into paint.

Hey, if you don’t know the rules (and even if you do) you are allowed to break them… do what pleases you. Try whatever. It’s your art.

This is my first go with silicone oil (the recommended additive) and I’m thinking that I kind of like using gun oil instead. Maybe it works better when heat is applied? I priced those handy dandy little torches with the trigger handles while out shopping. It was a nice little kit with various tips for $27 US. I almost bought it, but then remembered that I already have a pencil torch. Of course, I later discovered that mine is out of fluid so I’ll have to try applying heat another day. I also missed the deadline for 5×5 submissions, totally forgot about it until a friend posted photos from the show, so I didn’t donate anything to the YMCA this year. Drats!

Liner Notes

  • PAINT: liquid acrylics (black, white, red, metallic gold)
  • FLOW MEDIUM: diluted Elmer’s Glue-ALL
  • ADDITIVE: Silicone oil
  • GROUND: 5 x 5 inch Ampersand Gesobord
  • HEAT: none
WIP set atop upside down cups on re-purposed foam meat tray

Thanks for looking!

Pour 6, on ACEO CB

Getting started… dripped paint mixtures directly on ACEO size canvas board.
WIP: tilt, turn, blow, and even shake a bit trying to control paint flow
Pour #6: colors shift, darken as it dries.
So much for using painter’s tape and handles… still ended up with a messy back.
Finishing back with matte black… signed with my artist symbol.
The “YO” stands for Youngstown, Ohio

Liner Notes

  • PAINT: Plaid Apple Barrel liquid acrylics (black, wild iris, parrot blue); Plaid Extreme Glitter (silver)
  • FLOW MEDIUM: diluted Elmer’s Glue-ALL
  • ADDITIVE: Hoppe’s 9 gun oil
  • GROUND: 2.5 x 3.5 inch (ACEO size) canvas board prepped by covering back with painters tape, adding sticks for handles, and wetting top surface with water.
  • HEAT: waved a Bic lighter and blew on it (so need a torch thing)

Working on the little canvas board was much easier to control the flow, perhaps because ACEO is my favorite size. Stick handles helped, kept my fingers off the edges. I still ended up with a messy back.

I’m not sure if adding a couple drops of gun oil did anything. I used it because don’t have any silicone, which is the suggested additive in most of the tutorial videos, and figured Hoppe’s 9 is one of the best “fine oils” for anything. I’ll buy silicone and one of those heat torch things when I’m able to go shopping again. I don’t wander much when the streets are icy.

Oh, I’ve been making ACEO size art for so long that I forget that not everyone know what an ACEO is… ACEO is an acronym for “Art Cards, Editions and Originals” which is just miniature art, any medium, that measures 2.5 x 3.5 inches. Most are thin like sports cards, but there is no rule on thickness. Some people call this size ATC for “Artist Trading Cards” and yes, ATC and ACEO are the exact same size. It’s one of those things that are the same but not the same… the only difference is what you do with them. Artist Trading Cards are meant to be traded (never sold) and traded exclusively between artists as a means to network, share techniques, etc. Call it an ACEO and you can do whatever you want with it… sell it, trade it, no exclusive bull, anyone (not just artists) are “allowed” to collect art in this size. Considering the old masters traded (or sold) their art cards for food, lodging, and other things they needed; I stand with the ACEO crowd.

Thanks for reading!

Acrylic Pour No.2

My second pour attempt turned out so much better than the first.

Liner Notes:

  • PAINT:  little bottles of liquid craft acrylics
  • COLORS:  Royal Purple, Vanilla Ice Cream, Pure Gold, Black
  • FLOW MEDIUM:  diluted Elmer’s GLUE ALL
  • ADDITIVE:  hair clipper oil (didn’t have silicone OR hair oil, figured close enough)
  • GROUND:  same sheet of 140 lb., 100% cotton, cold pressed watercolor paper.
  • METHOD:  drizzle/pour paint mixtures directly onto ground
  • BLOW TORCH:  no

The biggest surprise discovered about pouring on nice thick cotton paper was how good it feels, almost like a leather or something, after it dried. Yes, it warped a bit as it was drying, but a little flexing made it flat again. When you pour on paper, you can cut out interesting areas as smaller art or for other uses, perhaps to make a cover for a homemade journal book.

I’ll experiment with other grounds later… right now, I’m playing with paper.

UPDATE: I chopped it up.

Yield: one 5×5, a bookmark, 4 ACEO’s, and (on far right) a folded book cover.
Inside the little handmade book, 28 pages (7 folios) using 50 lb sketch paper.

Thanks for reading!